Culture

Taylor Swift and Scooter Braun have not yet resolved their issues publicly over his acquiring of her music catalog (he owns the masters/original recordings of her first six albums, while she owns the lyrics and compositions), something Swift described as a “worst case scenario” because of “incessant, manipulative bullying I’ve received at his hands for years.”

And privately, peace has not been brokered yet either, but that isn’t for lacking of trying on Braun’s part, apparently. Variety and The Blast report that Braun tried to reach out to Swift to talk, but she didn’t take him up on the opportunity.

Multiple sources connected with the deal told The Blast that Braun reached out through mutual friends Monday morning to engage in a ‘mature and private’ phone call with Swift.” Braun, those sources told The Blast, wanted to discuss the business aspects of the purchase, express his shock over her public reaction to it, and make it clear that “the main reason he purchased her catalogue is because he believes in her music and in her future.”

Variety also reported yesterday that Braun’s “attempts to reach Swift directly have so far been fruitless.

The Blast reports that Braun was genuinely “shocked” by Swift’s public letter and is “very hurt” by the situation. Sources close to Braun previously told The Blast that he had no idea that Swift had tried to buy back her music.

At this point it hasn’t been reported that Swift has spoken to him privately. But it has only been two days since news of the purchase broke. Upon Swift’s publishing of her letter emotional reactions poured in from other celebrities—some on her side, some not.

In her statement, Swift wrote that she understood by leaving her old record label Big Machine Records, her music catalog there would likely be sold to someone else. “When I left my masters in [Big Machine Records founder] Scott [Borchetta]’s hands, I made peace with the fact that eventually he would sell them,” she started. “Never in my worst nightmares did I imagine the buyer would be Scooter. Any time Scott Borchetta has heard the words ‘Scooter Braun’ escape my lips, it was when I was either crying or trying not to. He knew what he was doing; they both did. Controlling a woman who didn’t want to be associated with them. In perpetuity. That means forever.”

“Thankfully, I am now signed to a label that believes I should own anything I create,” she continued. “Thankfully, I left my past in Scott’s hands and not my future. And hopefully, young artists or kids with musical dreams will read this and learn about how to better protect themselves in a negotiation. You deserve to own the art you make.”

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